All participants in off-site events must meet 10 minutes prior to departure. Meet-up location and time are provided in each event description. Accessibility information is also included in the descriptions below. To register for off-site events, please visit the ASA conference registration site

Please note: registration fees are neither refundable nor transferable. Forfeited registration and ticket fees will automatically transfer to the Baxter Travel Grant Fund. The Baxter Grants provide partial travel reimbursement to advanced graduate students who are members of the ASA and who will travel to the convention in order to appear on the Annual Meeting program.

Demilitarization Detour

Friday, November 8, 2019, 8:00am-3:00pm
Cost of tickets: $ 51.00 (includes lunch).  Sold out.
Reserve a spot now

The Demilitarization tour, led by Hawaiʻi Peace and Justice, traces Hawaiian wahi pana (storied places) and critically examines the hidden-in-plain-sight manifestations of U.S. militarization in Hawaiʻi and its impact on Hawaiian sovereignty, land, culture, and political economy. The tour visits pivotal sites in the history of Hawaiʻi, including ʻIolani Palace, the scene of the U.S.-backed overthrow of Queen Liliʻuokalani, Camp Smith, headquarters of the U.S. Pacific Command, and the Pearl Harbor naval complex, the center of U.S. military power in the Pacific. The tour ends at Hanakehau Farm before returning to the Convention Center.  

Meet Vernadette, Kyle and Aunty Terri in the lobby of the Convention Center 10 minutes before departure at 7:50am. The bus is ADA accessible, moderate walking at each stop on the tour. Wear sunscreen, hat, comfortable shoes, bring water and snacks. 

Sponsored by the Site Resource Committee
Led by Kyle Kajihiro & Aunty Terri Keko‘olani
CONTACT: Vernadette Gonzalez



UH Mānoa Student Activism/Kānewai/Kamakūokalani

Friday, November 8, 2019, 8:30am-11:15am
Cost of tickets: $24.00. Sold out.
Reserve a spot now

This walking tour of UH Mānoa explores the university as an academic arm of US occupation in Hawaiʻi and the struggle over knowledge production. The tour highlights sites of research and sites of political contestation, with a particular focus on the resistance campaigns of students and faculty who refuse empire and fight for spaces to reclaim the very knowledge systems that the university has served to marginalize. This tour will include a more detailed history of the fight for Maunakea and how the students and faculty of UH have organized to call for an end to colonial research. 

Meet ‘Ilima in the lobby of the Convention Center 10 minutes before departure at 8:20am. The bus is ADA accessible. This will be a walking tour of UH Mānoa, which is moderately accessible. Wear sunscreen, hat, comfortable shoes, bring water and snacks. 

Sponsored by the Site Resources Committee
CONTACT: ‘Ilima Long



Hawaiʻi’s Plantation Village: Plantation Nostalgia and Historical Erasure

Saturday, November 9, 2019, 8:00am-1:00pm
Cost of tickets: $52.00 (includes transportation & entry fee). Sold out.
Reserve a spot now

The excursion is a visit to Hawaiʻi’s Plantation Village, an outdoor museum that attempts to recreate life on a sugar plantation. Located in Waipahu, Oʻahu, the village is a popular destination for locals and visitors alike, promising to open, “a door to a time of true hospitality and cultural sharing that sprung from Hawaiʻi’s plantation life.” On the bus ride out to the museum (approx. 30 minutes), Dr. Dean Saranillio and Dr. Kealani Cook will lead a discussion of the role of the plantations in Hawaiian history as well as the role of “plantation nostalgia” in erasing the indigenous history of Hawaiʻi, the exploitation of labor groups split among ethnic and racial lines, and the legacy of both in modern day Hawaiʻi. The ride back from the village will provide an opportunity for reflection and discussion among the participants.

Meet Kealani and Dean in the lobby of the Convention Center at 7:50am. The bus is ADA accessible. This will be a walking tour of the site which is moderately accessible. Wear sunscreen, hat, comfortable shoes, bring water and snacks. 

Sponsored by the Site Resources Committee 
Led by Dean Saranillio & Kealani Cook
CONTACT: Kealani Cook



Downtown and ʻIolani Palace Tour

Saturday, November 9, 2019, 8:30am-10:30am
Cost of tickets: $10.00. Sold out.
Reserve a spot now

This tour combines a palimpsestic history of the capitol district of Honolulu with a decolonial look at ‘Iolani Palace, the seat of the Hawaiian Kingdom and currently a museum. It will cover iconic tourist sites: ‘Iolani Palace, the Kamehameha Statue, Kawaiahaʻo Church, the State Capitol, and Aloha Tower, linking them together with Hawaiʻi’s difficult and profoundly conflicted history, contextualizing them within the nexus of economic power that developed on the islands from the early 19th century onward.  

Participants will meet at Walker Park, 700 Fort St. Mall (intersection of Queen St. and Fort St. from Aloha Tower). Finishing at the Palace. It is an 11 min. drive (Uber or Lyft) or 17 min. Biki ride from the Convention Center to Walker Park. Meet at the Park at 8:20am. The walking tour is approximately .5 miles. It is ADA accessible (on sidewalks downtown). Wear sunscreen, hat, comfortable shoes, bring water and snacks.

Sponsored by the Site Resources Committee
Led by Craig Howes & Noenoe Silva
CONTACTS: Heoli Osorio and Karen Kosasa



Waikīkī Demilitarism and Labor Tour

Saturday, November 9, 2019, Noon – 2:00pm
Cost of tickets: Free. Sold out.
Reserve a spot now

This tour will immediately follow the Program Committee sponsored panel “Radical Labor Organizing and Decolonization” (10:00 – 11:45). Participants will meet in the lobby of the Convention Center at 11: 50 and ride a bus to Fort DeRussey, a military museum in the heart of Waikīkī. In addition to provide an analysis of the overlap between tourism and militarism, Aunty Terri and Ellen Rae will facilitate a discussion about Indigeneity, immigrant workers, settler colonialism and Hawaiian political and economic independence. Participants will return to the Convention Center by 2:00pm for the next session. Participants will meet Hokulani, Aunty Terri and Ellen Rae in the lobby of the Convention Center at 11:50am. 

Sponsored by the Detours Project & the Hawaiʻi Council for Humanities
Led by Aunty Terri Kekoʻolani and Ellen Rae Cachola
CONTACT: Hokulani Aikau



Art in Times of Crisis: American Muslims on Cultural Expression, Islam and Political Action at the Shangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture, and Design

Saturday, November 9, 2019 from 4:00 to 6:00pm
Cost of Tickets: $5.00; 15 spaces left.
Reserve a spot now

This museum visit features a discussion that will focus on the work of Shangri La resident Anida Yoeu Ali and her redevelopment of The Red Chador: Regenesis I project. A performance artist, educator, and global agitator, Ali is a first-generation Khmer Muslim refugee born in Cambodia and raised in Chicago. In conversation with scholar Sylvia Chan-Malik, the two will discuss Ali’s work and notions of Islamic Art and Muslim identity in and beyond an American context. A discussion with Su’ad Abdul Khabeer, Zareena Grewal, Najwa Mayer, Belquis Elhadi, and Juliane Hammer will follow.

Attendees will have to take a shuttle from the Hawaiʻi Convention Center to Shangri La; there is no direct access to the museum. Attendees should allow time for travel before and after the event.  Shangri La is open for children ages 8 and up.

Sponsored by the ASA and Shangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture, and Design.

CONTACTS: Karima Daoudi and Asad Ali Jafri


Kaka‘ako Tour

Saturday, November 9, 2019, 4:30pm-6pm
Cost of tickets: $10.00. Sold out.
Reserve a spot now

Kakaʻako is a rapidly changing neighborhood in Honolulu’s urban core, located in the ahupuaʻa of Waikīkī, along the coastal edge of the neighboring ʻili of Kaʻākaukukui and Kukuluāeʻo. Boasting a world-renowned street art scene, hip bars and restaurants, and multi-million-dollar condos, it also carries complex histories of displacement, change, and urban injustice. This walking tour interrogates the politics of gentrification and settler colonial urban development in Kakaʻako. Attendees will learn about the rich Indigenous and working-class past and present of the neighborhood. We will also discuss contemporary issues of urban justice, including Hawaiʻi’s affordable housing crisis, community struggles for public space, and ongoing settler state violence towards people experiencing houselessness.

Participants will meet at Kolowalu Park, at the corner of Queen St. and Waimanu St. at 4:15 pm.  (The park is a 25-minute walk from the Convention Center, a 10-minute drive or 9-minute Biki ride.) The tour is approximately a 1-mile walk to Kaka‘ako Makai Gateway Park (Ala Moana and Ohe Street). After the tour, participants can stay in the area to enjoy a number of restaurants (Moku, Highway Inn, and Honolulu Beer Works), cafes, and bars (Bevy).  The tour is ADA accessible (on sidewalks downtown). Wear sunscreen, hat, comfortable shoes, bring water.

Sponsored by the Site Resources Committee
Led by Tina Grandinetti
CONTACT: Cynthia Franklin



Mokauea

Sunday, November 10, 2019, 8:00am-2:00pm
Cost of tickets: $47.00 (includes transportation & lunch). 7 seats left.
Reserve a spot now

In Keʻehi Lagoon, between Honolulu Harbor and the International Airport, lies the 10-acre islet of Mokauea, the site of Oʻahu’s last Hawaiian fishing village, and one of the only two left in Hawaiʻi. In the 1970s, families living on Island were threatened with eviction by the State of Hawaiʻi. Since 2005, Hui o Mauliola has led the effort to environmentally and culturally restore Mokauea Island and the Keʻehi area by working with Mokauea descendants to re-create a living example of a traditional Hawaiian subsistence fishing village. This service-learning tour of Mokauea aims to provide participants with the opportunity to contribute to these restoration efforts while learning more about the challenges and triumphs of restoring Indigenous waterscapes in Hawaiʻi. Conference participants who choose to attend this tour will be required to get wet and paddle on an outrigger canoe for ten minutes to get to Mokauea.  

Meet Candace and Halena in the lobby of the Convention Center at 7:50am.  Participants should be comfortable on water and there may be walking on reef flats. Wear sunscreen, hat, reef walkers and bring water, snacks packed in waterproof bag (i.e. ziplock bag).

Sponsored by the Site Resources Committee
Led by Kēhaulani Souza Kupihea
CONTACTS: Candace Fujikane and Halena Kapuni-Reynolds



Mai Poina: A Walking Tour of the Overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom

Sunday, November 10, 2019
Group #1 tour time is 2:40pm; Group #2 tour time is 3:00pm.
Cost of Tickets: $30.00 (includes transportation & presentation fee). 
Group #1: 27 seats left.  Group #2: 17 seats left.
Reserve a spot now

Mai Poina: The Overthrow is a 75-minute living history walking tour on the grounds of ‘Iolani Palace that retraces the four pivotal days leading up to and including the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy. At the end, participants can dialogue with Native Hawaiian scholars on historical context and resonance today, and hear spoken-word poetry from Pacific Tongues, bringing historical issues into the urgent present. The walking tour, co-hosted with the Hawaiʻi Council for the Humanities, is performed annually in September and January in order to educate those who live in Hawaiʻi and those who visit about the true history of the Kingdom and the United States’ role in the overthrow of Queen Liliʻuokalani. 

Group # 1 (tour starts at 2:40pm) will meet at the Convention Center at 1:45pm and will return to the Convention Center at 4:45pm. 
Group # 2 (tour stats at 3:00pm) will meet at the Convention Center at 2:30pm and will return to the Convention Center at 5:00pm
Wear comfortable shoes, hat, sunscreen and bring water & snacks.

Sponsored by the Site Resources Committee
CONTACTS: Noelle Kahanu and Aiko Yamashiro
For more info, visit the 'Iolani Palace website.