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Events

Feb. 1 | CFP 2015 Annual Meeting
Click here. The submission site will automatically shut down at 11:59 PM (Pacific) on February 1, 2015.

Mar. 1 | 2015 Franklin Prize
Nominations for 2015 John Hope Franklin Publication Prize for the best-published book in American Studies due

Mar. 1 | 2015 Romero Prize
Nominations for 2015 Lora Romero Publication Prize for the best-published first book in American Studies due.

Mar. 1 | 2015 Community Partnership Grants
Applications for the 2015 Community Partnership Grants Program to assist American Studies collaborative, interdisciplinary community projects due

Mar. 1 | 2015 Regional Chapter Grants
Applications for the 2015 grants program to assist regional American Studies conferences and projects due

Prizes and Grants

ASA Awards and Prizes

Carl Bode-Norman Holmes Pearson Prize
Angela Y. Davis Prize
Mary C. Turpie Prize
John Hope Franklin Publication Prize
Lora Romero First Book Publication Prize
Ralph Henry Gabriel Dissertation Prize
Constance M. Rourke Prize
Gene Wise - Warren Susman Prize
Yasuo Sakakibara Prize
ASA Conflict of Interest Statement
Awards Ceremony 2012
Awards Ceremony 2013
Awards Ceremony 2014

Carl Bode - Norman Holmes Pearson Prize

The American Studies Association is proud to announce it is accepting nominations for the Bode-Pearson Prize for Outstanding Contributions to American Studies. The members of the prize committee are: Chair: Michael Cowan, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, and Janice Radway.

The Bode-Pearson Prize, established in 1975, is one of the oldest and most prestigious awards in American Studies. The prize is awarded periodically at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association and includes lifetime membership in the ASA for the recipient. The prize is awarded to an individual for a lifetime of achievement and service within the field of American Studies. The prize winner must be a member of the Association. The prize winner will be announced at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, Friday, October 9, 2015.

Nominations for 2015:

All nomination materials should be assembled by the nominator(s) and transmitted to the prize committee electronically in the form of a single PDF.

Nomination materials might include:

1. A statement describing the nominee's career in American Studies, noting special achievements and contributions in research and scholarship, service to the ASA, other academic service and teaching, work in academic journals, public forums and/or on the internet, and any involvement with international projects and conferences. A copy of the nominee's CV.

2. Supporting letters from collaborators, colleagues, and mentored students. These letters can be individually authored, but nominators might consider soliciting a smaller set of collectively authored letters with multiple signatories.

3. URLs for any relevant websites.

Submitted materials should be representative, rather than exhaustive. Total materials submitted should not exceed 50 pages. For more information, potential nominators may contact the committee chair, Michael Cowan (mhcowan@ucsc.edu). One set of nominating materials must be submitted to the prize committee no later than June 30, 2015.

All application materials should be assembled by the submitter(s) and transmitted to the prize committee electronically in the form of a single PDF via the Online Submission Form here: Online Submission Form. You may also ship the application PDF via Dropbox to (asastaff@theasa.net).


Bode-Pearson Prize Recipients, 1975-2014:

  • 2014: Michael Denning, Yale University
  • 2013: Alfred Hornung, University of Mainz, Germany
  • 2012: Donald E. Pease, Dartmouth College
  • 2011: Janice Radway, Northwestern University
  • 2010: There was no award presented
  • 2009: Miles Orvell, Temple University
  • 2008: H. Bruce Franklin, Rutgers University, Newark
  • 2007: Sacvan Bercovitch, Harvard University
  • 2006: Paul Lauter, Trinity College
  • 2005: Lois W. Banner, University of Southern California
  • 2004: Murray G. Murphey, University of Pennsylvania
  • 2003: Doris Friedensohn, New Jersey City University
  • 2002: Martha Banta, University of California, Los Angeles
  • 2001: Gloria E. Anzaldúa and Cherríe Moraga
  • 2000: John Hope Franklin, Duke University
  • 1999: Günter H. Lenz, Humboldt-Universität, Berlin, Germany
  • 1998: Gary Y. Okihiro, Columbia University
  • 1997: Bernice Johnson Reagon, American University
  • 1996: Allen F. Davis, Temple University
  • 1995: Leo Marx, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • 1994: There was no award presented
  • 1993: Daniel Aaron, Harvard University
  • 1992: There was no award presented
  • 1991: Arthur Dudden, Bryn Mawr College
  • 1990: Betty Ch'maj, California State University, Sacramento
  • 1989: John A. Hague, Stetson University
  • 1988: Albert E. Stone, University of Iowa
  • 1987: Michael Cowan, University of California, Santa Cruz
  • 1986: There was no award presented
  • 1985: Warren Susman, Rutgers University and Gene Wise, University of Maryland
  • 1984: There was no award presented
  • 1983: Ralph Henry Gabriel, Yale University
  • 1982: There was no award presented
  • 1981: Robert E. Spiller, University of Pennsylvania
  • 1980: There was no award presented
  • 1979: Henry Nash Smith, University of California, Berkeley
  • 1978: There was no award presented
  • 1977: Merle Curti, University of Wisconsin
  • 1976: Mary Turpie, University of Minnesota
  • 1975: Norman Holmes Pearson, Yale University

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Angela Y. Davis Prize

The ASA invites nominations for the Angela Y. Davis Prize for Public Scholarship. The members of the prize committee are: Chair: Mary Helen Washington, Michelle Mitchell, David Roediger, and Sonia Saldivar-Hull.

This award recognizes scholars who have applied or used their scholarship for the "public good." This includes work that explicitly aims to educate the public, influence policies, or in other ways seeks to address inequalities in imaginative, practical, and applicable forms. Eligible projects include but are not limited to public art, exhibits, films, performances, books, collaborations with community-based organizations, and engaging students in community-based projects.

The prize is awarded periodically at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association and includes lifetime membership in the ASA for the recipient. The prizewinner must be a member of the Association. The prize winner will be announced at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, Friday, October 9, 2015.

Nominations for the 2015

All nomination materials should be assembled by the nominator(s) and transmitted to the prize committee electronically in the form of a single PDF.

Nomination materials might include:

1. A statement describing the nominee's career in American Studies, noting special achievements and contributions in research and scholarship; service to the ASA; other public service and teaching; collaborations with community-based organizations; and examples of work that helped to educate the public, influence policies, or in other ways addressed inequalities in imaginative, practical, and applicable forms. A copy of the nominee's CV.

2. Supporting letters from collaborators, colleagues, and mentored students. These letters can be individually authored, but nominators might consider soliciting a smaller set of collectively authored letters with multiple signatories.

3. URLs for any relevant websites.

Submitted materials should be representative, rather than exhaustive. Total materials submitted should not exceed 50 pages. For more information, potential nominators may contact the committee chair, Mary Helen Washington (mhwash@umd.edu).

One set of nominating materials must be submitted to the prize committee no later than June 30, 2015.

All application materials should be assembled by the submitter(s) and transmitted to the prize committee electronically in the form of a single PDF via the Online Submission Form here: Online Submission Form. You may also ship the application PDF via Dropbox to (asastaff@theasa.net).


Angela Y. Davis Prize Recipients 2012-2014-

  • 2014: Rosa-Linda Fregoso, University of California, Santa Cruz
  • 2013: George Lipsitz, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • 2012: Ruth Wilson Gilmore, City University of New York Graduate Center

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Mary C. Turpie Prize

The American Studies Association is proud to announce it is accepting nominations for the Mary C. Turpie Prize. The members of the prize committee are: Chair: Lucy Maddox, Bruce Burgett, and Mark Metzler Sawin.

The Mary C. Turpie Prize, established in 1993, is given to the candidate who has demonstrated outstanding abilities and achievement in American Studies teaching, advising, and program development at the local or regional level. The prize is awarded periodically at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association and includes life-time membership in the ASA for the recipient. The prize winner must be a member of the Association. The prize winner will be announced at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, Friday, October 9, 2015.

Nominations for 2015

All nomination materials should be assembled by the nominator(s) and transmitted to the prize committee electronically in the form of a single PDF. Nomination materials might include:

1. a statement describing the nominee's achievements in developing degree programs, curricula, and (or) academic or public forums; the intellectual orientation of this programming (e.g., the critical frameworks or priorities that informed the design); the contribution of this programming to the home institution, as well as to local and regional publics; and (if relevant) its contribution to the field of American studies at the national or international levels. This statement might also address the contributions of the nominee's research to the field of American studies, as well as the bearing of the research on the teaching and programmatic work.

2. Two or three American studies (or otherwise relevant) syllabi.

3. Supporting letters from collaborators, colleagues, and graduate students mentored. These letters can be individually authored, but nominators might consider soliciting a smaller set of collectively authored letters with multiple signatories.

4. URLs for any relevant websites.

Submitted materials should be representative, rather than exhaustive; the committee strongly encourages that longer documents (e.g., program reviews) be excerpted or summarized. Total materials submitted should not exceed 50 pages. For more information, potential nominators may contact the committee chair, Lucy Maddox (maddoxl@georgetown.edu). One set of nominating materials must be submitted to the prize committee no later than June 30, 2015.

All application materials should be assembled by the submitter(s) and transmitted to the prize committee electronically in the form of a single PDF via the Online Submission Form here: Online Submission Form. You may also ship the application PDF via Dropbox to (asastaff@theasa.net).


Mary C. Turpie Prize Recipients, 1994-2014:

  • 2014: Melody Graulich, Utah State University
  • 2013: Joy Kasson, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • 2012: Alan Wald, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • 2011: Thomas Vernon Reed, Washington State University
  • 2010: Matthew Pratt Guterl, Indiana University
  • 2009: Vera Norwood, University of New Mexico
  • 2008: Maria Irene Ramalho de Sousa Santos, University of Coimbra, Portugal
  • 2007: James Salem, University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa
  • 2006: Michael Steiner, California State University, Fullerton
  • 2005: Joanna S. Zangrando, Skidmore College
  • 2004: Norman R. Yetman, University of Kansas
  • 2003: Daniel Horowitz, Smith College
  • 2002: Eric J. Sandeen, University of Wyoming
  • 2001: Robert A. Gross, College of William and Mary
  • 2000: Jesper Rosenmeier, Tufts University
  • 1999: Simon Bronner, Pennsylvania State University
  • 1998: Jay E. Mechling, University of California, Davis
  • 1997: Michael Aaron Rockland, Rutgers University
  • 1997: Lois P. Rudnick, University of Massachusetts, Boston
  • 1996: Alma Payne, Bowling Green State University
  • 1995: Richard Slotkin, Wesleyan University
  • 1994: Paul R. Baker, New York University
  • 1994:Charles Bassett, Colby College

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John Hope Franklin Publication Prize

The American Studies Association is delighted to announce the 2015 competition for the John Hope Franklin Publication Prize. This $1000 prize (newly increased) is awarded every year for the best-published book in American Studies. The period of eligibility for the 2015 John Hope Franklin Publication Prize will include books published between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2014. To be eligible, books must be written in English, but the competition is not restricted to works printed in the United States. Nominees should be current ASA members. The winning author must be a member of the Association. Authors and publishers may submit books. First books are eligible for both the Franklin and Romero prizes. The prizewinner will be announced at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, Friday, October 9, 2015..

Submissions for 2015

One paper copy and one electronic copy (if available) of each entry must be sent to each of the following committee members no later than March 1, 2015; a separate email listing each entry should also be sent to the members of the committee so they can verify the arrival of all volumes.

Chair: Bethany Moreton
Institute for Research in the Humanities
University of Wisconsin - Madison
432 East Campus Mall, Room 221
Madison WI 53706
moreton@uga.edu

Eric Lott
Department of English
CUNY Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue, 4409
New York, NY 10016
elott@gc.cuny.edu

Rinaldo Walcott
Department of Sociology and Equity Studies
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
The University of Toronto
252 Bloor Street West
Toronto, ON M5S 1V6
rinaldo.walcott@utoronto.ca

All entries must be clearly marked "Franklin Prize Entry." The prize honors John Hope Franklin, James B. Duke Professor Emeritus at Duke University, and past president of the American Studies Association

John Hope Franklin Publication Prize Recipients, 1987-2014:

  • 2014: Raúl Coronado, A World Not To Come: A History of Latino Writing and Print Culture (Harvard University Press 2013).
  • 2013: Lisa Marie Cacho, Social Death: Racialized Rightlessness and the Criminalization of the Unprotected (New York University Press, 2012)
  • 2012: Mark Rifkin, When Did Indians Become Straight?: Kinship, the History of Sexuality, and Native Sovereignty (Oxford University Press, 2011)
  • 2011: Khalil Gibran Muhammad, The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America (Harvard University Press, 2010)
  • 2010: Bethany Moreton, To Serve God and Wal-Mart: The Making of Christian Free Enterprise (Harvard University Press, 2009)
  • 2009: Ussama Makdisi, Artillery of Heaven: American Missionaries and the Failed Conversion of the Middle East (Cornell University Press, 2008)
  • 2008: Julie Sze, Noxious New York: The Racial Politics of Urban Health and Environmental Justice (MIT Press, 2007)
  • 2007: Jake Kosek, Understories: The Political Life of Forests in Northern New Mexico (Duke University Press, 2006).
  • 2006: Rebecca J. Scott, Degrees of Freedom: Louisiana and Cuba after Slavery (Harvard University Press, 2005).
  • 2005: Premilla Nadasen, Welfare Warriors: The Welfare Rights Movement in the United States (Routledge, 2004)
  • 2004: Brent Hayes Edwards, The Practice of Diaspora: Literature, Translation, and the Rise of Black Internationalism (Harvard University Press, 2003)
  • 2003: Emily Thompson, The Soundscape of Modernity: Architectural Acoustics and the Culture of Listening in America, 1900-1953 (MIT Press, 2002)
  • 2002: Mary Renda, Taking Haiti: Military Occupation and the Culture of US Imperialism, 1915-1940 (University of North Carolina Press, 2001)
  • 2001: Leigh Eric Schmidt, Hearing Things: Religion, Illusion, and the American Enlightenment (Harvard University Press 2000)
  • 2000: Walter Johnson, Soul by Soul: Life inside the Antebellum Slave Market (Harvard University Press, 1999)
  • 1999: Matthew Frye Jacobson, Whiteness of a Different Color: European Immigrants and the Alchemy of Race (Harvard University Press, 1998)
  • 1998: Kirk Savage, Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves: Race, War and Monument in Nineteenth-Century America (Princeton University Press, 1997)
  • 1997: Kevin Gaines, Uplifting the Race: Black Leadership, Politics, and Culture in the Twentieth Century (University of North Carolina Press, 1996)
  • 1996: Stephanie McCurry, Masters of Small Worlds: Yeoman Households, Gender Relations, and the Political Culture of the Antebellum South Carolina Low Country (Oxford University Press, 1995)
  • 1995: Elizabeth Lunbeck, The Psychiatric Persuasion: Knowledge, Gender and Power in Modern America (Princeton University Press, 1994)
  • 1994: Angela Miller, The Empire of the Eye: Landscape Representation and American Cultural Politics, 1825-1875 (Cornell University Press, 1993)
  • 1993: Gwendolyn Midlo Hall, Africans in Colonial Louisiana: The Development of Afro-Creole Culture in the Eighteenth Century (Louisiana State University Press, 1992)
  • 1992: Ramón A. Gutiérrez, When Jesus Came, The Corn Mothers Went Away: Marriage, Sexuality, and Power in New Mexico, 1500-1846 (Stanford University Press, 1991)
  • 1991: Lawrence Fuchs, The American Kaleidoscope: Race, Ethnicity, and the Civic Culture (Wesleyan University Press, University Press of New England, 1990)
  • 1990: Nathan O. Hatch, The Democraticization of American Christianity (Yale University Press, 1989)
  • 1990: Miles Orvell, The Real Thing: Imitation and Authenticity in American Culture (University of North Carolina Press, 1989)
  • 1989: Joan Jacobs Brumberg, Fasting Girls: The Emergence of Anorexia Nervosa as a Modern Disease (Harvard University Press, 1988)
  • 1988: Marcus Rediker, Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Merchant Seamen, Pirates, and the Anglo-American Maritime World, 1700-1750 (Cambridge University Press, 1987)
  • 1987: Dell Upton, Holy Things and Profane: Anglican Parish Churches in Virginia (The Architectural History Foundation, 1986)

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Lora Romero First Book Publication Prize

The American Studies Association is delighted to announce the 2015 competition for the Lora Romero First Book Publication Prize. The prize consists of a lifetime membership in the ASA and is awarded every year for the best-published first book in American Studies that highlights the intersections of race with gender, class, sexuality and/or nation. The period of eligibility for the 2015 Lora Romero First Book Publication Prize will include books published between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2014. To be eligible, books must be written in English, but the competition is not restricted to works printed in the United States. Nominees should be current ASA members. The winning author must be a member of the Association. Authors and publishers may submit books. First books are eligible for both the Franklin and Romero prizes. The prizewinner will be announced at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, Friday, October 9, 2015.

Submissions for 2015

One paper copy and one electronic copy (if available) of each entry must be sent to each of the following committee members no later than March 1, 2015; a separate email listing each entry should also be sent to the members of the committee so they can verify the arrival of all volumes

Kyla Wazana Tompkins
Department of English
Pomona College
140 West 6th St.
Claremont, CA 91711
Kyla.Tompkins@pomona.edu

Ricardo L. Ortíz
Department of English
37th and O St's NW, 306 New North Hall
Georgetown University
Washington, DC 20057-1131
ortizr@georgetown.edu

Steven Salaita
American Indian Studies
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
1204 West Nevada Street
Urbana, Illinois 61801
salaitas@gmail.com

The prize honors Lora Romero, a valued and long-active member of the American Studies Association, former Assistant Professor at Stanford University, and author of Home Fronts: Nineteenth Century Domesticity and Its Critics (1997).

Romero Prize Recipients, 2002-2014:

  • 2014: Alexandra T. Vazquez, Listening in Detail: Performances of Cuban Music (Duke University Press, 2013).
  • 2013: Kyla Wazana Tompkins, Racial Indigestion: Eating Bodies in the Nineteenth Century (New York University Press, 2012)
  • 2012: Nicole Fleetwood, Troubling Vision: Performance, Visuality, and Blackness (University of Chicago Press, 2011)
  • 2011: Cynthia M. Blair, I've Got to Make My Livin': Black Women's Sex Work in Turn-of-the-Century Chicago (University of Chicago Press, 2010)
  • 2010: Margot Canaday, The Straight State: Sexuality and Citizenship in Twentieth-Century America (Princeton University Press, 2009)
  • 2009: Alicia R. Schmidt Camacho, Migrant Imaginaries: Latino Cultural Politics in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands (New York University Press, 2008)
  • 2008: Ruth Wilson Gilmore, Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California (University of California Press, 2007)
  • 2007: Ned Blackhawk, Violence Over the Land: Indians and Empires in the Early American West (Harvard University Press, 2006).
  • 2006: Tiya Miles, Ties That Bind: An Afro-Cherokee Family in Slavery and in Freedom (University of California Press, 2005)
  • 2005: Mae M. Ngai, Impossible Subjects: Aliens and the Making of Modern America (Princeton University Press, 2004)
  • 2004: Kandice Chuh, Imagine Otherwise: On Asian Americanist Critique (Duke University Press, 2003)
  • 2003: Shelley Streeby, American Sensations: Class, Empire, and the Production of Popular Culture (University of California Press, 2002)
  • 2002: Sharon Holland, Raising the Dead: Readings of Death and (Black) Subjectivity (Duke University Press, 2001)

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Ralph Henry Gabriel Dissertation Prize

The Ralph Henry Gabriel Prize is awarded annually to the best doctoral dissertation in American Studies, American Ethnic Studies or American Women's Studies. The prize honors Ralph Henry Gabriel, Professor Emeritus at Yale University, and a founder and past president of the American Studies Association.

Nominations for 2015

The American Studies Association is pleased to announce the competition for the 2015 Ralph Henry Gabriel Dissertation Prize. The $500 prize will be awarded by the Association for the best doctoral dissertation in American Studies.

The period of eligibility for the Gabriel Prize will include dissertations completed between July 1, 2014 and June 30, 2015. Each graduate American Studies, American Ethnic Studies, or American Women's Studies program may nominate two dissertations that will have been completed under its aegis during the period of eligibility for the award. The competition is limited to candidates receiving the Ph.D. degree in American Studies, American Ethnic Studies, or American Women's Studies. Individuals may not nominate their own dissertations. The winning author must be a member of the Association. The prizewinner will be announced at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, Friday, October 9, 2015.

The procedure for submission is as follows:

The Director of each graduate American Studies, American Ethnic Studies, or American Women's Studies program, in consultation with the faculty, will be eligible to choose for submission up to two dissertations completed in the program during the period of eligibility. The Director will then send to each member of the prize committee the dissertation abstracts, a sample chapter from each dissertation selected, and a cover letter explaining why each dissertation deserves the award. The deadline for submission is June 1, 2015. A separate letter listing each entry should also be sent to the members of the committee so they can verify the arrival of all nominating materials.

Chair: Alyosha Goldstein
Department of American Studies
Humanities Building 425, MSC 03 2110
University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
agoldste@unm.edu

Lisa Hajjar
Department of Sociology
Social Sciences and Media Studies Bldg 3018
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106
lhajjar@soc.ucsb.edu
Submit all materials to Professor Hajjar (lhajjar@soc.ucsb.edu) electronically via Dropbox.

Karen Shimakawa
Performance Studies
New York University
721 Broadway, 6FL
New York, NY 10003
kshimakawa@nyu.edu

Based on their reading of the materials submitted, the prize committee will then invite a short list of up to seven nominees to submit their completed dissertations for formal review.

Please note that the Ralph Henry Gabriel Dissertation Prize does not include publication with any individual press or publishing house.

Ralph Henry Gabriel Dissertation Prize Recipients, 1987-2014:

  • 2014: Juliana Hu Pegues, University of Minnesota, "Interrogating Intimacies: Asian American and Native Relations in Colonial Alaska"
  • 2013: Maile Arvin, University of California, San Diego, "Pacifically Possessed: Scientific Production and Native Hawaiian Critique of the 'Almost White' Polynesian Race"
  • 2012: Ana Raquel Minian, Yale University, "Undocumented Lives: A History of Mexico-US Migration from 1965-1986"
  • 2011: Robert Hawkins, Saint Louis University, "Natural Born Ease Man? Work, Masculinity, and the Itinerant Black Musician"
  • 2010: Wendy Cheng, University of Southern California, "Episodes in the Life of a Place: Regional Racial Formation in Los Angeles's San Gabriel Valley"
  • 2009: Stephanie Schulte, George Washington University, "State Technology to State of Being: The Making of the Internet in Global Popular Culture, 1980-2000"
  • 2008: Caroline Frank, Brown University, "China as Object and Imaginary in the Making of an American Nation, 1690-1790"
  • 2007: Daniel Wei HoSang, University of Southern California, "Racial Propositions: Genteel Apartheid in Postwar California"
  • 2006: Laura Isabel Serna, Harvard University, " 'We're Going Yankee': American Movies, Mexican Nationalism, Transnational Cinema, 1917-1935"
  • 2005: Alyosha Goldstein, New York University, "Civic Poverty: An Empire for Liberty through Community Action"
  • 2004: Brian Klopotek, University of Minnesota, "The Long Out-waiting: Federal Recognition Policy in Three Louisiana Indian Communities"
  • 2003: Adria L. Imada, New York University, "Aloha America: Hawaiian Entertainment and Cultural Politics in the U.S. Empire"
  • 2002: Katherine Masur, University of Michigan, "Reconstructing the Nation's Capital: The Politics of Race and Citizenship in the District of Columbia, 1862-1878"
  • 2001: Shirley Thompson, Harvard University, "The Passing of a People: Creoles of Color in Mid-Nineteenth Century New Orleans"
  • 2000: Jurretta Jordan Heckscher, George Washington University, "'All the Mazes of Dance': Black Dancing, Culture, and Identity in the Greater Chesapeake World from the Early Eighteenth Century to the Civil War"
  • 2000: Meredith Raimondo, Emory University, "The Next Wave: Media Maps of the 'Spread of AIDS'"
  • 1999: John Stauffer, Yale University, "The Black Hearts of Men: Race, Religion, and Radical Reform in Nineteenth-Century America"
  • 1998: Steven Michael Waksman, University of Minnesota, "Instruments of Desire: The Electric Guitar and the Shaping of Musical Experience"
  • 1997: Margaret T. McFadden, Yale University, "Anything Goes: Gender and Knowledge in the Comic Popular Culture of the 1930's"
  • 1996: Rachel Buff, University of Minnesota, "Calling Home: Migration, Race and Popular Memory in Caribbean Brooklyn and Native American Minneapolis, 1945-1992"
  • 1996: Melani McAlister, Brown University, "Staging the American Century: Race, Gender, and Nation in U.S. Representations of the Middle East, 1945-1992"
  • 1995: Jill Lepore, Yale University, "The Name of War: Waging, Writing, and Remembering King Philip's War"
  • 1994: Alicia Gaspar de Alba, University of New Mexico, "Mi Casa [No] Es Su Casa: The Cultural Politics of the Chicano Art: Resistance and Affirmation, 1965-1985 Exhibition"
  • 1993: Christophe Den Tandt, Yale University, "The Urban Sublime in American Literary Nationalism"
  • 1992: Matthew Jacobson, Brown University, "Special Sorrows: Irish-, Polish-, and Yiddish-American Nationalism in the Diasporic Imagination"
  • 1991: Kent Ryden, Brown University, "Mapping the Invisible Landscape: Geography, Narrative, and the Sense of Place"
  • 1990: Marianne Doezema, Boston University, "George Bellows and Urban America, 1905-1913"
  • 1989: Janice Knight, Harvard University, "A Garden Enclosed: The Rhetoric of the Heart in Puritan New England"
  • 1988: Benedict Giamo, Emory University, "On the Bowery: Symbolic Action in American Culture and Subculture"
  • 1998: Mary Corbin Sies, University of Michigan, "American Country House Architecture in Context: The Suburban Ideal of Living in the East and Midwest, 1877-1917
  • 1987: Christian Appy, Harvard University, "A War for Nothing: A Social History of American Soldiers in Vietnam"
  • 1987:Paula Rabinowitz, University of Michigan, "Female Subjectivity in Women's Revolutionary Novels of the 1930's"

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Constance M. Rourke Prize

The Constance M. Rourke Prize is awarded annually to the best article published in American Quarterly. Award: $100.00.

The American Studies Association is pleased to announce the competition for the 2015 Constance P. Rourke Prize. The members of the prize committee are: Chair: Dayo Gore, Laura Briggs, and Lisa Marie Cacho.

The $100 prize will be awarded by the Association for the best article to appear in Volume 66 (2014) of American Quarterly. The winning author must be a member of the Association. The prizewinner will be announced at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, Friday, October 9, 2015.

Constance M. Rourke Prize Recipients, 1987-2014:

  • 2014: Janet M. Davis, "Cockfight Nationalism: Blood Sport and the Moral Politics of American Empire and Nation Building" (September 2013)
  • 2013: Jana Lipman, " 'Give us a Ship': The Vietnamese Repatriate Movement on Guam, 1975" (March 2012)
  • 2012: Eric Tang, "A Gulf Unites Us: The Vietnamese Americans of Black New Orleans East" (March 2011)
  • 2011: Myisha Priest, "The Nightmare Is Not Cured": Emmett Till and American Healing" (March 2010)
  • 2011: Special recognition to the special issue of American Quarterly, "Alternative Contact: Indigeneity, Globalism, and American Studies," editors Paul Lai and Lindsey C. Smith (September 2010)
  • 2010: Sara E. Johnson, "'You Should Give them Blacks to Eat': Waging Inter-American Wars of Torture and Terror" (March 2009)
  • 2009: Daniel Scroop, "The Anti-Chain Store Movement and the Politics of Consumption" (December 2008)
  • 2008: Ann Pellegrini, "Signaling Through the Flames": Hell House Performance and Structures of Religious Feeling" (September 2007)
  • 2007: Maria Farland, "W. E. B. DuBois, Anthropometric Science, and the Limits of Racial Uplift" (December 2006)
  • 2006: Daryl J. Maeda, "Black Panthers, Red Guards, and Chinamen: Constructing Asian American Identity through Performing Blackness, 1969-1972" (December 2005)
  • 2005: George J. Sánchez, "'What's Good for Boyle Heights Is Good for the Jews': Creating Multiculturalism on the Eastside during the 1950s" (September 2004)
  • 2004: Sarah Banet-Weiser, "Elián González and 'The Purpose of America': Nation, Family, and the Child-Citizen" (June 2003)
  • 2003: Mary Niall Mitchell, "Rosebloom and Pure White,' Or So It Seemed" (September 2002)
  • 2002: Scott Saul, "Outrageous Freedom: Charles Mingus and the Invention of the Jazz Workshop" (September 2001)
  • 2001: Laura Briggs, "The Race of Hysteria: "Overcivilization" and the "Savage" Woman in Late Nineteenth-Century Obstetrics and Gynecology" (June 2000)
  • 2000: Kenrick Ian Grandison, "Negotiated Space: The Black College Campus as a Cultural Record of Postbellum America" (September 1999)
  • 1999: Susan A. Glenn, "'Give an Imitation of Me': Vaudeville Mimics and the Play of the Self" (March 1998)
  • 1998: Mark Pittenger, "A World of Difference: Constructing the 'Underclass' in Progressive America" (March 1997)
  • 1998: Sarah Robbins, "Gendering the History of the Antislave Narrative: Juxtaposing Uncle Tom's Cabin and Benito Cereno, Beloved and Middle Passage" (September 1997)
  • 1997: Daniel Horowitz, "Rethinking Betty Friedan and The Feminine Mystique: Labor Union Radicalism and Feminism in Cold War America." (March 1996)
  • 1996: Kristine C. Kuramitsu, "Internment and Identity in Japanese American Art" (December 1995)
  • 1995: Lori Ginzburg, "'The Hearts of Your Readers Will Shudder': Fanny Wright, Infidelity, and American Freethought" (June 1994)
  • 1994: Lori Merish, "'The Hand of Refined Taste' in the Frontier Landscape: Caroline Kirkland's A New Home, Who'll Follow? and the Feminization of American Consumerism" (December 1993)
  • 1993: Terence Whalen, "Edgar Allen Poe and the Horrid Law of Political Economy" (September 1992)
  • 1992 Eric Lott, "'The Seeming Counterfeit': Racial Politics and Blackface Minstrelsy" (June 1991)
  • 1991: Werner Sollors, "Of Mules and Mares in a Land of Difference; or, Quadrupeds All?" (June 1990)
  • 1990: Lizabeth Cohen, "Encountering Mass Culture at the Grassroots: The Experience of Chicago Workers in the 1920s" (March 1989)
  • 1989: E. Jennifer Monaghan, "Literacy Instruction and Gender in Colonial New England" (March 1988)
  • 1988: Peter Seixas, "Lewis Hine: From 'Social' to 'Interpretative' Photographer" (Fall 1987)
  • 1987: Alan Taylor, "Treasure Seeking in the American Northeast, 1780-1830" (Spring 1986)

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Gene Wise - Warren Susman Prize

The American Studies Association is pleased to announce the competition for the 2015 Wise-Susman Prize. The members of the prize committee are: Chair: Lisa Kahaleole Hall, Jayna Brown, and Robert McRuer.

Student members of the American Studies Association who have had papers accepted for the 2015 annual meeting may compete for a student paper award. The winning author must be a member of the Association. The prizewinner will be announced at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, Friday, October 9, 2015.

The Gene Wise - Warren Susman Prize includes a certificate and $500.00 in cash awarded for the best paper presented by a graduate student at the meeting. The winning paper may deal with any aspect of American history, literature, or culture, but should reflect the breadth, the critical imagination, the intellectual boldness, and the cross-disciplinary perspective so strongly a part of the scholarship of both Gene Wise and Warren Susman. The paper must represent original work not previously presented.

Submissions for 2015

Submit one copy of each conference length paper, i.e., 10-12 type written pages or about 3,500 words, including citations and notes (unedited dissertation chapters or seminar-length papers are not acceptable), no later than September 1, 2015. Include a cover letter with author's name, institutional affiliation, paper title, and contact information, electronically in the form of a single PDF. (Illustrations are not counted as part of the 10-12-page limit and may be uploaded in a separate PDF file)

All application materials should be assembled by the author and transmitted to the prize committee electronically in the form of a single PDF via the Online Submission Form here: Online Submission Form. You may also ship the paper PDF via Dropbox to (annualmeeting@theasa.net).

Wise-Susman Prize Recipients, 1987-2014:

  • 2014: Stuart Schrader, "Rethinking the Militarization of Policing: Counterinsurgent Knowledge and California's Response to the Watts Rebellion"
  • 2013: Rabia Belt, "What Does Citizenship Mean for People with Mental Disabilities?"
  • 2012: Megan Black, "Guardians of 'Global' Resources: Visualizing Energy and Empire in U.S.Government-Sponsored Film, 1949-1956"
  • 2011: Carolyn Hardin, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, "Neoliberal Temporality: Time-Sense and the Shift from Pensions to 401(k)'s"
  • 2010: Jon Shelton, University of Maryland, College Park, "Against the Public: The Pittsburgh Teachers Strike of 1975-76 and the Decline of Liberalism"
  • 2009: Ziv Eisenberg, Yale University, "Red All Over: Protecting the American Body Politic from Infection in the Early Twentieth Century"
  • 2008: James Brown, University of Minnesota, "Interdisciplinary American Studies and the Cold War: A New, Archival History from the Records of the Library of Congress"
  • 2007: Erin Park Cohn, University of Pennsylvania, "Imprinting Race: The Philadelphia Fine Print Workshop of the WPA Federal Art Project and the Visual Politics of Race"
  • 2006: Carisa Worden, New York University,"Violence of the Body and Reform of the Soul: Prisons as the Emblem of America"
  • 2005 : Dean Itsuji Saranillio, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, "Kêwaikaliko's Benocide: Legal Lynchings, Colonialism, and Reversing the Imperial Gaze of Rice v. Cayetano and its Legal Progeny"
  • 2004: Ana Elizabeth Rosas, University of Southern California, "En Aquellos Tiempos": Mexican Women and Men and the Cultural Politics of Bracero Labor Camp Culture, 1954-56"
  • 2003: Lisa Soccio, University of Rochester, "Locust Abortion Technician Meets "Hamburger Lady": Shock as Symbolic Violence and Subcultural Signifier"
  • 2002: Jane Dusselier, University of Maryland, College Park, Identity, "Community, and Place: Art in Japanese American Concentration Camps"
  • 2001: Robin Bernstein, Yale University, "Talismans of the Middle Class: Nineteenth-Century Postmortem Daguerreotypes of Children"
  • 2000: John Streamas, Bowling Green State University, "Japanese American Concentration Camp Home Movies and a Loss of Public Life"
  • 1999: Adria L. Imada, New York University, "Hawaiians on Tour: Hula Circuits Through the American Empire"
  • 1998: Floyd Cheung, Tulane University, "Parading Masculinities: Euro-American and Chinese Imperialism and Gender in Territorial Arizona"
  • 1997: Michael A. Elliott, Columbia University, "Telling the Difference: Narratives of Racial Taxonomy in the Late Nineteenth Century United States"
  • 1996: Andrea Volpe, Rutgers University, "Bodily Attitudes: Posing Stands and the Respectable Body in Cartes de Visite Portrait Photographs"
  • 1995: Julie Berebitsky, Temple University, "Rescue a Child and Save the Nation: The Social Construction of Adoption in the Delineator, 1907-11"
  • 1994: Jennifer Delton, Princeton University, "Identity, Labor and Race: Black Politics in Minneapolis, 1945-50"
  • 1993: Mary W. Blanchard, Rutgers University, "The Aesthetic Parlor, the Object d'Art, and the Sedated Self"
  • 1992: Siobhan Somerville, Yale University, "Visible Differences: Scientific Racism and the Emergence of the Homosexual Body"
  • 1991: Mary W. Blanchard, Rutgers University, "The Intellectual Roots of an Aesthetic: Candace Wheeler and Her American Vision"
  • 1990: Csaba Toth, University of Minnesota, "Rivers of Contrast: Europe and the Utopias of Gronlund, Bellamy, and Donnelly"
  • 1989: Kirk Savage, University of California, Berkeley, "The Politics of Memory: Black Emancipation and the Civil War Monument"
  • 1988: Eric Lott, Columbia University, "Blackface and Blackness: The Politics of Early Minstrelsy"
  • 1987: Chris Rasmussen, Rutgers University, "Responding to Regionalism: The Iowa State Fair Art Salon"

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Yasuo Sakakibara Prize

The American Studies Association is pleased to announce the competition for the 2015 Yasuo Sakakibara Prize. The members of the prize committee are: The members of the prize committee are: Chair: Ira Dworkin, Paul Amar, and Jasbir Puar

International scholars who have had papers accepted for the 2015 annual meeting may compete for this convention paper award. Scholars or practitioners whose institutional affiliation is outside the United States are eligible. The prizewinner will be announced at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, Friday, October 9, 2015.

The Yasuo Sakakibara Prize includes a certificate and $500.00 in cash awarded for the best paper presented by an international scholar at the meeting. The winning paper may deal with any aspect of American history, culture, or society. The winning author must be a member of the American Studies Association or an affiliated international American Studies Association.

The prize honors Yasuo Sakakibara, Professor Emeritus of Economics and first chair of the Graduate School in American Studies at Doshisha University, and a past president of the Japanese Association for American Studies.

Submissions for 2015

Submit one copy of each conference length paper, i.e., 10-12 type written pages or about 3,500 words, no later than September 1, 2015; include a cover letter with author's name, institutional affiliation, paper title, and contact information.

All application materials should be assembled by the author and transmitted to the prize committee electronically in the form of a single PDF via the Online Submission Form here: Online Submission Form. You may also ship the PDF via Dropbox to (annualmeeting@theasa.net).

Sakakibara Prize Recipients, 2002-2014:

  • 2014: Mary Chapman, University of British Columbia, "Playing in the Mediascape: A Pseudonymous Travelogue by Sui Sin Far/Edith Eaton"
  • 2013: Ethan Blue, University of Western Australia, "The Deportation Special: Mobile Carceral Space and the Emergence of Mass Deportation"
  • 2012: Leslie Paris, University of British Columbia, "'˜The Mess They Leave Behind': American Children and Environmental Activism, 1962-1980"
  • 2011: Ira Dworkin, The American University in Cairo (Egypt), "George Washington Williams, King Leopold II, and African American Emigration to the Congo"
  • 2010: Chris Lee, University of British Columbia, "New Criticism as Modernization"
  • 2009: Leslie Paris, University of British Columbia, "Happily Ever After: Reading Free to Be ... You and Me"
  • 2008: Chih-ming Wang, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, "How does America Mean in Chinese? Overseas Student Writing and Trans-Pacific American Studies"
  • 2007: No Selection
  • 2006: Mary Chapman, University of British Columbia, Canada, "Sui Sin Far and the Discourses of the American and Chinese Suffrage Movements in the 1910's"
  • 2005: Finis Dunaway, Trent University, Canada, "Gas Masks, Pogo, and the Ecological Indian: Earth Day and the Visual Politics of American Environmentalism"
  • 2004: Lily Cho, University of Western Ontario, Canada, "Seeing through Smoke: Situating the Coolie within the Discourse of Freedom"
  • 2003: Min-Jung Kim, Ewha Woman's University, Seoul, Korea, "Nation, Immigration, and National Identity in Ronyoung Kim's Clay Walls"
  • 2002: Joanne M. Mancini, University of Sussex, United Kingdom, "The Country Age: Globalization and Modernity in an American Region"

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