Founded In    1970
Published   3/year
Language(s)   English, French
     

Fields of Interest

 

Humanities

     
ISSN   0007-7720

E-ISSN: 1710-114X

     
Publisher   University of Toronto Press - Journals
     
Editorial Board

Editor - Priscilla Walton Priscilla L. Walton is Professor of English at Carleton University, and is also an Associate faculty member in Communication and Film Studies. She is the author of Our Cannibals, Ourselves: The Body Politic (Illinois, 2004), Patriarchal Desire and Victorian Discourse: A Lacanian Reading of Anthony Trollope's Palliser Novels (Toronto, 1995), and The Disruption of the Feminine in Henry James (Toronto, 1992). She is the co-author, along with Manina Jones, of Detective Agency: Women Rewriting the Hardboiled Tradition (California, 1999), and, along with Jennifer Andrews and Arnold E. Davidson, of Border Crossings: Thomas King's Cultural Inversions (Toronto, 2003). She co-edited Pop Can: Popular Culture in Canada (Prentice-Hall, 1999), and edited the Everyman Paperback edition of Henry James's The Portrait of a Lady.

Editorial Address Canadian Review of American Studies Priscilla Walton Department of English Carleton University Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6 pwalton@ccs.carleton.ca

Associate Editors

Sherrill Grace, English, University of British Columbia

Yuko Matsukawa, English, SUNY Brockport

Bruce Tucker, History, University of Windsor

Michael Zeitlin, English, University of British Columbia

Review Editors

Michael Dorland, Journalism and Communication, Carleton University

Jennifer Harris, English, Mount Alison University

Editorial Board

Martha Banta, English, UCLA William Boelhower, American Literature, University of Texas

Gert Buelens, English, Ghent University

Jill Conway, History, MIT

Thadious Davis, English, Brown University

Frances Early, History/Women's Studies, Mount St. Vincent University

Michael Fellman, History, Simon Fraser University

Serge Guilbaut, Fine Art, University of British Columbia

Harry H. Hiller, Sociology, University of Calgary

Linda Hutcheon, English, University of Toronto

Michael Hutcheon, University Health Network, University of Toronto

Victor Konrad, Geography & Environmental Studies, Carleton University

Rob Kroes, American Studies, University of Amsterdam

Yves Laberge, Philosophy, Laval University

Linda Maram, Ethnic Studies, California State University at Long Beach

John S. Martin, English, University of Calgary

Robert K. Martin, Études anglaises, Universite de Montreal

Michèle Mendelssohn, Oxford University

Stuart J. Murray, English, Carleton University

Jeanne Perreault, English, University of Calgary

Ernest Redekop, English, University of Western Ontario

Jean Edward Smith, Political Science, University of Toronto

David Thelen, History, Indiana University

Marcia Valiante, Law, University of Windsor

Mary Helen Washington, English, University of Maryland

Submission Guidelines and Editorial Policies

Submission Guidelines and/or Editorial Policies
The journal publishes articles, review articles, and short reviews whose purpose is the multi- and interdisciplinary analysis and understanding of the culture, both past and present, of the United States and of the relations between the cultures of the United States and Canada. We invite contributions from authors in all relevant scholarly disciplines related to the study of the United States, in English or in French.

Please visit www.utpjournals.com/cras for full submission guidelines

     

» Ceasefire or New Battle? The Politics of Culture Wars in Obama’s Time

With the 2012 U.S. Presidential race in its closing stages, this very timely special issue aims to generate a deeper understanding of the U.S. culture wars. The issue contributes to the ongoing debates on whether or not there are culture wars currently underway in the U.S. and, if there are, who is waging these wars and what are the strategies and motivations behind them. The issue addresses four key research questions - Is a culture war really underway in America?; Is this ‘war�(tm) only between activists and politicians?; Who are the main actors in these wars and how do they try to reach their goals?; and Have we been witnessing a ceasefire in (or transformation of) America�(tm)s culture wars since Obama�(tm)s election in 2008? Guest Editor - Fr�(c)d�(c)rick Gagnon

» States of Emergency: Anxiety, Panic, Nation now available

 

Canadian Review of American Studies

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Canadian Review of American Studies is published three times a year by the Canadian Association for American Studies with the support of Carleton University. It publishes essays, review essays and shorter reviews whose purpose is the multi- and inter-disciplinary analysis and understanding of the culture, both past and present, of the United States - and of the relations between the cultures of the U.S. and Canada. It invites contributions from authors in, and outside, all relevant scholarly disciplines, in English and French. Canadian orders include membership in the Canadian Association for American Studies. E-ISSN: 1710-114X ISSN: 0007-7720

Canadian Review of American Studies Online now offers a comprehensive resource for the best work being done in American Studies today. CRAS Online now includes the complete archive of current and previously published articles - more than 1200 articles, reviews and commentaries - going back to 1970(issue1.1).

Enhanced features not available in the print version - supplementary information, colour photos, videos, audio files, etc. encouraging further exploration and research.

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Canadian Review of American Studies 42.3, December 2012 - Ceasefire or New Battle? The Politics of Culture Wars in Obama's Time , Volume 42, Number 3

With the 2012 U.S. Presidential race in its closing stages, this very timely special issue aims to generate a deeper understanding of the U.S. culture wars. The issue contributes to the ongoing debates on whether or not there are culture wars currently underway in the U.S. and, if there are, who is waging these wars and what are the strategies and motivations behind them. The issue addresses four key research questions - Is a culture war really underway in America?; Is this ‘war�(tm) only between activists and politicians?; Who are the main actors in these wars and how do they try to reach their goals?; and Have we been witnessing a ceasefire in (or transformation of) America�(tm)s culture wars since Obama�(tm)s election in 2008? Guest Editor - Fr�(c)d�(c)rick Gagnon

Introduction: Ceasefire or New Battle? The Politics of Culture Wars in Obama’s Time


Immigration and National Identity in Obama’s America: The Expansion of Culture-War Politics


The culture-war issues salient in US politics in the 1990s and early 2000s were typified by debates over the legality and morality of abortion and same-sex marriage. Immigration, in contrast, has been an intermittent issue, not as polarized as many others. That changed with the candidacy and then election of Barack Obama to the presidency. While anti-abortion and “pro-family” activism has continued, there is a new public focus on a vision of “America” that depends upon a conflation of race, religion, and national identity. This has helped transform immigration into a highly charged, highly polarized culture-war-style issue and has facilitated the lasting resonance of the construction of Obama as Muslim, as born in Kenya, as not a citizen, and as both a socialist and a fascist simultaneously. Drawing on popular media discourse and material from Tea Party and immigration reform web sites, I explore the construction of American national identity in terms of its ethno-cultural articulations. http://utpjournals.metapress.com/content/346242023880g412/?p=96084b25dec64fd0a6a67d3f58bec577&pi=3 DOI: 10.3138/cras.42.3.004

Understanding Culture Wars through Satirical/Political Infotainment TV: Jon Stewart and The Daily Show's Critique as Mediated Re-enactement of the Culture War


Recent US culture wars have been waged through televised entertainment news (infotainment TV). The imprint left by Jon Stewart and The Daily Show on mainstream news outlets has been analyzed in political communication studies and media studies. However, no one has so far made a case for Jon Stewart as a protagonist in these culture wars, especially because Stewart himself wants to stay clear of and set himself apart from them. This paper looks at the performativity of these culture wars in infotainment TV as the medium and locus where the culture wars are waged. While I recognize the crucial role played by Jon Stewart and The Daily Show in critiquing news-media coverage of American politics, I nevertheless contend that Stewart can also be seen as a culture warrior, albeit an unwilling one, and that, by giving him a voice, the medium of infotainment TV is turning him into such a warrior. My argument is predicated on the belief that satirical/political infotainment TV is an important locus of the culture wars and must be studied carefully because it plays a political role in mediating their re-enactment. Using this news-media satirical form as epistemological grounding, I first focus on how these culture wars play out in satirical/political infotainment TV and show that infotainment TV, because it is mediated as such, both critiques and re-enacts the culture wars and affects the American journalistic mediascape. I then examine satirical infotainment TV as political practice. http://utpjournals.metapress.com/content/e6j2542n57j31006/?p=96084b25dec64fd0a6a67d3f58bec577&pi=4 DOI: 10.3138/cras.42.3.005

Crusade or Charade? The Religious Right and the Culture Wars


This article challenges conventional views about the Religious Right and the culture wars in the United States, as it contends that the general topic has often been distorted in important respects. Specifically, it advances several somewhat counter-intuitive claims. It contends that the Religious Right is neither a long-standing nor a monolithic entity; that it is currently relatively dormant; that cultural criticisms associated with religious conservatives are often not driven not by grass-roots populism but are cynically promulgated by mainstream Republican elites for electoral gain; and finally, that even when these efforts succeed electorally, conservative elected officials seldom enact policies that cultural or religious conservatives want. In short, much that has appeared in recent years to be a cultural crusade may, in fact, be a mere charade. http://utpjournals.metapress.com/content/bh1h6765538n8v01/?p=96084b25dec64fd0a6a67d3f58bec577&pi=1 DOI: 10.3138/cras.42.3.002

After the Culture War? Shifts and Continuities in American Conservatism


Following the 2008 American election, some analysts concluded that the election had signalled an end to the polarization and culture wars that had typified American politics. To some, demographic changes would cause this demise. To others, the moderating of religious groups was crucial. As social conservatives came to grips with the 2008 electoral defeats, some argued for emphasis on culture-war issues to revive their role. Sin No More (John Dombrink and Daniel Hillyard, 2007) had argued that, despite conservative rhetoric, the tide was turning on the core legal and moral issues of the American culture war, moving them toward normalization. It challenged the representation of America as a “centre-right” country. This article analyzes enduring and shifting elements of the American culture war: the broadening of the role of religion, the reduced salience of wedge issues, and the paradox that some forms of polarization are increasing as others are receding. http://utpjournals.metapress.com/content/0448604p301k7658/?p=96084b25dec64fd0a6a67d3f58bec577&pi=2 DOI: 10.3138/cras.42.3.003

Other Issues

Special Issue: States of Emergency: Anxiety, Panic, Nation, Volume 42, Number 1
2005, Vol. 35, No. 1