Founded In    1956
Published   quarterly
Language(s)   English, German
     

Fields of Interest

 

literature, cultural studies, history, political science, linguistics, critical theory, teaching of American Studies

     
ISSN   0340-2827
     
Editorial Board

General Editor:
Oliver Scheiding

Editorial Board:
Christa Buschendorf
Andreas Falke
Hans-Jürgen Grabbe
Alfred Hornung
Sabine Sielke

Assistant Editors:
Tanja Budde
Patricia Godsave

Submission Guidelines and Editorial Policies

Manuscripts and books for review should be submitted to the editorial office in Mainz. There is no obligation to review unsolicited books.
Amerikastudien / American Studies
Prof. Dr. Oliver Scheiding
FB 05 Dept. of English and Linguistics Amerikanistik
Johannes Gutenberg - Universität Mainz
Jakob Welder Weg 18 (Philosophicum), Zi 02-579
55128 Mainz, Germany
Phone: +49 6131 39 22 357
Fax: +49 6131 39 20 356
Email: redaktion@amerikastudien.de
In view of the computerized production of the journal, manuscripts of articles and reviews can only be accepted if submitted as computer files (preferably MS Word) and accompanied by a printout. Please note the following formal requirements:
– Article manuscripts - manuscript text, abstract, notes, list of works cited - should not exceed 60,000 to 70,000 characters (including spaces).
– All articles must be preceded by an abstract in English of no more than 200 words.
– Since Amerikastudien / American Studies follows a blind-review system, articles should contain no references to the author.
– An Amerikastudien / American Studies style sheet is available under http://www.amerikastudien.de/quarterly/
The editorial team gladly provides a MS Word document template file (DOT) that is used for pre-typesetting (preflighting).

     

Amerikastudien / American Studies

ALTTEXT

Amerikastudien / American Studies is the journal of the German Association for American Studies. It started as the annual Jahrbuch für Amerikastudien in 1956 and has since developed into a quarterly with some 1200 subscriptions in Europe and the United States. The journal is dedicated to interdisciplinary and transnational perspectives and embraces the diversity and dynamics of a dialogic and comparatist understanding of American Studies. It covers all areas of American Studies from literary and cultural criticism, history, political science, and linguistics to the teaching of American Studies. Thematic issues alternate with regular ones. Reviews, forums, and annual bibliographies support the international circulation of German and European scholarship in American Studies.
(www.amerikastudien.de/quarterly/)
Editor: Oliver Scheiding
Address: Amerikastudien/American Studies
FB 05 Dept. of English and Linguistics Amerikanistik
Johannes Gutenberg - Universität Mainz
Jakob Welder Weg 18 (Philosophicum), Zi 02-579
55128 Mainz, Germany
Phone: +49 6131 39 22 357
Fax: +49 6131 39 20 356
Email: redaktion@amerikastudien.de

 

» Visit Journal Web Site

Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007, Vol. 52, No. 2

'The American Democrat' Reads Democracy in America: Cooper and Tocqueville in the Transatlantic Hall of Mirrors


Tocqueville and Cooper have traditionally been seen as ideological brothers in arms, but the relationship between their political theories is far more complex. Both proceed from the problem of preserving liberty by containing the excesses of mass democracy, but their positions within Atlantic and national discourses on liberty and equality engender diverging definitions, perceptions, and solutions concerning American government and democracy. From a postcolonial perspective, Cooper rejects Tocqueville and his authority as a representation of the European imperial gaze as well as the colonized American mind. As a classical republican Cooper defines democracy as a society based on the natural principles of equal rights and social inequality, in which order is contingent upon the deference of the many to a natural aristocracy of virtue and talent. This model collides with Tocqueville's understanding of democracy as homogenous equality, which requires completely new means of checking the threat of majority tyranny. While Cooper's assessment of American inequality was empirically more accurate, Tocqueville had a better understanding of the implications of democratic modernity, though his popularity with Americans, as Cooper partly understood, resulted from the possibility of reading his study as a long-awaited European endorsement of American democracy.

'Kindred Spirits' in Romantic Walks: Durand's Kindred Spirits compared to Friedrich's Wanderer über dem Nebelmeer


Asher B. Durand's painting Kindred Spirits (1849) is probably his most well-known work. As the embodiment of the artistic principles of the nineteenth-century American landscapists, much has been made of this painterly tribute to Thomas Cole, the founder of the Hudson River School. Yet, if we insert it into the peripatetic tradition, it yields fruitful results in that it more fully illuminates the simultaneously depicted peripatetic stations of "Knowledge" and "Arrival," as well as the nineteenth-century dialogue between the sister arts of writing and painting. It is also most remarkable for the size of the portrayed protagonists in the painting. In fact, it is one of the few canvases of the Hudson River School that can vie in its figures' size with C. David Friedrich's famous Wanderer über dem Nebelmeer (ca. 1817), its European counterpart, as to the walk in painting. A brief summary about the peripatetic tradition, its poetic stations, and the iconography of the act of walking in painting will precede the comparison of the two canvases. Underlying the exploration of the parallels and differences of the walk in the New and the Old World are the questions as to the relationship between man and nature as well as the inherent landscape aesthetics.

'Try Not to Love such a Country': The Americanization of Sholom Aleichem's Yiddish Text


Mottel the Cantor's Son (1907, 1916), one of the most popular Yiddish novels of the twentieth century, is a story of emigration. As such, it is preoccupied with cross-cultural, cross-national, inter-religious, and inter-lingual relations. Aspiring to move from one geographical and cultural setting to another -- from the poverty-stricken Eastern-European Jewish town to the promisingly rich and excitingly modern "New World" of North America -- the characters, and to some extent also their author, Sholom Aleichem, are busy disparaging their former world and idealizing the new. The translation of the novel into English by Tamara Kahana (published 1953) augments this dynamics in its attempt to assimilate the work to the American canon and reduce its Jewishness. Kahana, being both a Jewish immigrant herself and the author's grandchild, is an involved translator. Rather than an act of mediation and communication, her strategy of translation appears to be an act of appropriation, a rewriting whereby the otherness of the source text is erased. At issue here -- for all three agencies that deliver Mottel's story to us (the narrator Mottel, the authorial voice, and the translator) -- is an ideal of identity that involves a break with the past. For Mottel and for Sholom Aleichem this ideal is America and the formation of an assimilated American identity; for Kahana it is a perfectly accessible Americanized story. However, in both the original text and in its translation, this ideal is continually, subtly subverted even as it is strenuously articulated and sought.

The Other West Side Story: Urbanization and the Arts Meet at Lincoln Center


When discussions began about a new performing arts center in Manhattan in the mid-1950s, philanthropists, impresarios, artistic directors, and educators welcomed the opportunity to broaden the audience for the arts. The idea was to go from "class" to "mass," as Edgar B. Young, the overseer of the project, put it. But most agree that Lincoln Center fell far short of that goal and, instead, re-inscribed the elitism of the high arts in its monumental architecture, conventional programming, and international rather than local gaze. This paper seeks to explore fissures in the monumentality of Lincoln Center by aligning indoor spaces alongside outdoor ones, particularly by adding an attention to spatial patterns and the performances inside the theaters to the more often viewed architecture and demographic changes of the neighborhood. It is an attempt to tie these stages -- the setting of some of the grandest performances in the world -- to the surrounding streets to reveal the defining features of the intertwining of the arts and urbanization in the post-World War II era that re-made American cities into "culture cities."

The Other West Side Story: Urbanization and the Arts Meet at Lincoln Center


When discussions began about a new performing arts center in Manhattan in the mid-1950s, philanthropists, impresarios, artistic directors, and educators welcomed the opportunity to broaden the audience for the arts. The idea was to go from "class" to "mass," as Edgar B. Young, the overseer of the project, put it. But most agree that Lincoln Center fell far short of that goal and, instead, re-inscribed the elitism of the high arts in its monumental architecture, conventional programming, and international rather than local gaze. This paper seeks to explore fissures in the monumentality of Lincoln Center by aligning indoor spaces alongside outdoor ones, particularly by adding an attention to spatial patterns and the performances inside the theaters to the more often viewed architecture and demographic changes of the neighborhood. It is an attempt to tie these stages -- the setting of some of the grandest performances in the world -- to the surrounding streets to reveal the defining features of the intertwining of the arts and urbanization in the post-World War II era that re-made American cities into "culture cities."

Other Issues

Amerikastudien / American Studies 2013, Vol. 58, No. 4 , Vol. 58, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2013, Vol. 58, No. 3
Pragmatism's Promise, Vol. 58, No. 2
Amerika Studien / American Studies 2013, Vol. 58, No. 1
Tocqueville's Legacy: Towards a Cultural History of Recognition in American Studies , Vol. 57, No.4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012, 57.3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012 - Conceptions of Collectivity in Contemporary American Literature, Vol. 57, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012, Vol. 57, Vol. 1
American Comic Books and Graphic Novels, Vol. 56, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2012, Vol. 56, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011, Vol. 56, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2011, Vol. 56, No. 1
African American Literary Studies: New Texts, New Approaches, New Challenges , Vol. 55, No. 4
Trauma's Continuum -- September 11th Reconsidered, Vol. 55, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2010, Vol. 55, No. 2
Poverty and the Culturalization of Class , Vol. 55, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009, Vol. 54, No. 4
American History/ies in Germany: Assessments, Transformations, Perspectives, Vol. 54, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2009, Vol. 54, No. 2
Appropriating Vision(s): Visual Practices in American Women's Writing, Vol. 54, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008, Vol. 53, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008 - Die Bush-Administration: Eine erste Bilanz, Vol. 53, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008, Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008 Vol. 53, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2008 - Inter-American Studies and Nineteenth-Century Literature, Vol. 53, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007, Vol. 52, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007 - Teaching American Studies in the Twenty-First Century, Vol. 52, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2007 - Transatlantic Perspectives on American Visual Culture, Vol. 52, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006, Vol. 51, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006 - Asian American Studies in Europe, Vol. 51, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006, Vol. 51, No. 2
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2006 - Multilingualism and American Studies , Vol. 51, No. 1
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2005, Vol. 50, No. 4
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2005 - Early American Visual Culture, Vol. 50, No. 3
Amerikastudien / American Studies 2005 - American Studies at 50, Vol. 50, Nos. 1/2